Hurricane Harvey

Okay, so this post is long, long overdue (indeed, I have not been keeping up with this blog as I intended at all!), and truly there is nothing I can say that hasn't already been said, but I wanted to share some personal photos of local recovery anyway. There are a multitude of anecdotes and stories online about how everyone came together to help in the recovery process, and area neighborhoods were no different. What really caught my attention, though, was the mood everyone was in. People weren't just working together - they were supporting each other and keeping each other's spirits up. The entire feeling was more of a community barbecue event than that of a major disaster recovery. It was a surprising and welcome discovery.

*Please forgive my blurring technique in any of the images - wanted to edit quickly while keeping privacy concerns in mind.

"Inside Out" Many residents of flood ravaged homes found themselves having to rid their homes of personal items and furniture. Flood water itself can be a health hazard and furniture can be as hard to rid of mold as the walls.

"Inside Out" Many residents of flood ravaged homes found themselves having to rid their homes of personal items and furniture. Flood water itself can be a health hazard and furniture can be as hard to rid of mold as the walls.

Masks and gloves were worn for safety reasons by many.

Masks and gloves were worn for safety reasons by many.

Local trash crews weren't allowed to pick up anything but the usual household trash leaving people wondering how they were going to handle the leftover refuse of tearing out their homes.

Local trash crews weren't allowed to pick up anything but the usual household trash leaving people wondering how they were going to handle the leftover refuse of tearing out their homes.

In some places water receded so quickly that some of the fish couldn't keep up. 

In some places water receded so quickly that some of the fish couldn't keep up.